1961 Pioneer Press Treasure Hunt

Hot on the heels of their find in 1959, the Longtin family made a repeat in 1961, claiming another $2500 prize. Mrs. Longtin found the medallion in the ashes of a bonfire unknowingly built on top of the treasure! This hunt also signified the first time the treasure was hidden in a park that had already been used.

Hunt information
Dates:
First Clue:Saturday, January 28, 1961
Found on:Saturday, February 4, 1961
Finders:
NameHometown
Eugene LongtinSaint Paul
Lucille LongtinSaint Paul
Joe LongtinSaint Paul
Dan LongtinSaint Paul
Eddie LongtinSaint Paul
Prize:
Maximum Prize:$2500
Awarded Prize:$2500
Location:
General Location:Highland Park
Exact Location:Near the ballfields at Montreal and Edgecumbe in the fire pit
Concealer:A clump of grass and weeds
Clues
Published on Sunday, January 29, 1961
It's Carnival time in old St. Paul
With a treasure hunt for one and all.
Get out your maps, warm clothing too,
The medallion's hid it's up to you.
Explanation:
"It's carnival time in old St. Paul" was taken from the official Winter Carnival song and indicated the treasure was hidden somewhere inside the St. Paul city limits. This clue also meant the treasure was a medallion, not a chest.
Our Thoughts:
A cool way of restricting the hunt to the city proper!
 
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Published on Monday, January 30, 1961
Veteran hunters need not be warned
That private property should be scorned.
Our safety rule must be repeated,
No dangers involved where it's secreted.
Explanation:
This clue meant the medallion was on public property and not in a dangerous location where someone could get hurt
Our Thoughts:
And we're back to recycling clues again, or at least a few lines from them.
 
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Published on Monday, January 30, 1961
The button you buy means more than pleasure
It can add more dough to Boreas' treasure.
Go forth and seek the treasure's lair,
Summertime fun flourishes there.
Explanation:
The words "summertime fun" meant the treasure was hidden in a location primarily used for summer recreation.
Our Thoughts:
Like, say, a park!
 
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Published on Tuesday, January 31, 1961
There is a road which ends too soon.
Used more often during June.
We wish you luck and lots of fun.
Hunting treasure by moon or sun.
Explanation:
This referred to the road leading from Montreal Ave. to the Hi-Tower Babe Ruth baseball field but stopping short of the treasure location. The road is used primarily during the baseball season.
Our Thoughts:
We believe this clue is the first acknowledgment by the Press of night-time hunting.
 
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Published on Tuesday, January 31, 1961
Solving this to find the dough
Will give you every right to crow
Start your search not far from home
In a place where animals roam.
Explanation:
Crows are frequently in evidence because of cornfields planted during the summer near Snelling Avenue. "Start your search not far from home" indicated home plate on the baseball field and "in a place where animals roam" meant the area is frequently used for dog walkers.
 
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Published on Wednesday, February 1, 1961
Colors of every sort and kind
May help you bring the spot to mind.
Red, white and even green
One in the distance can be seen.
Explanation:
This clue referred to the red snowfence, red-roofed bath house and red on the golf clubhouse roof. The baseball dugouts are green and the white tower of the Montgomery Ward & Co. store can be seen in the distance.
Our Thoughts:
We assume the Ward's store is the former midway location. If it is, this is an impressive observation given the distances involved!
 
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Published on Wednesday, February 1, 1961
Signs say no dumping without a fine
But cans lie near and often shine
For a happy end to this suspense
Don't ignore a red snow fence.
Explanation:
No dumping signs are on Montreal near Snelling. Empty beer cans are scattered throughout the area, however. There are four red snowfences in the area.
Our Thoughts:
This marks the second recycled clue in this hunt.
 
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Published on Thursday, February 2, 1961
This is the Carnival's diamond year,
And that's a clue but not so clear,
Though our treasure hunt is not as old,
For one decade you've sought the gold.
Explanation:
Diamond meant the Hi-Tower Babe Ruth baseball field
Our Thoughts:
A cool way of giving meaning to a carnival milestone.
 
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Published on Thursday, February 2, 1961
Think of numbers one to ten
Thirteen, twelve and one again
Six is a total seen afar,
We hope this clue is up to par.
Explanation:
Markers for innings on the baseball scoreboard are numbered 1 to 10. The number 13 refers to the silver posts on the baseball field backstop. Twelve are the number of trees surrounding the treasure location. One meant the flagpole on the baseball field. Six smokestacks can be seen in the distance, grouped five and one. The number also refers to Hwy. 51, which runs along Montreal Ave. Up to par meant the nearby Highland Park golf course.
Our Thoughts:
One of the smokestacks must have come down from when the treasure was first in Highland Park in 1952 and Cherokee Park in 1953.
 
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Published on Friday, February 3, 1961
Visitors entering this domain
Find protection from sun and rain.
Near a tower painted low
Stands a holder amid the snow.
Explanation:
The word visitors means visiting baseball teams and "domain" referred to Highland Park, which is Vulcan's domain. The visiting team's dugout at the baseball field furnishes protection from sun and rain. The word tower is painted on the baseball field scoreboard which is not high from the ground. "Stands a holder" meant the flagpole near the scoreboard.
Our Thoughts:
Didn't they reference the flagpole earlier?
 
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Published on Friday, February 3, 1961
Fleeting shadows come and go,
Like arrows zinging from a bow,
You learned in school to try your best.
Treasure hunting is a test.
Explanation:
Shadows of airplanes passing overhead on the way to or from Wold-Chamberlain airport creates fleeting shadows. The reference to arrows and bow meant the archery range. The word school referred to Highland Park Junior High School.
Our Thoughts:
These days the only time planes would shadow Highland Park would be from the crosswind runway (4/22). It's not often in use except for the 747 flight to and from Tokyo-Narita. It must have been a lot more common to use it back in those days.
 
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Published on Saturday, February 4, 1961
A road's the same on two sides of the plot,
Identify it and you're near the spot.
Glance around and look for trees.
Continue searching below your knees.
Explanation:
The road is Edgecumbe Road which runs north and south plus east and west in the Highland area. There are 12 trees surrounding the treasure's location. "Continue searching below your knees" meant the medallion was hidden on the ground.
 
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About eight feet from a cedar tree
Twixt wagon trails that form a "V"
You'll find it in a grassy bed.
Exactly where these clues have led.
Explanation:
One of the 12 trees surrounding the treasure was a cedar. Two double-wheeled trails come together near the spot, forming a "V". The medallion was hidden in a grassy bed before it snowed.
Our Thoughts:
This has got to be one of the first final clues to accurately pinpoint the location of the treasure.
 
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