1957 Pioneer Press Treasure Hunt

The treasure chest was found in a clump of roots above ground.

Hunt information
Dates:
First Clue:Saturday, January 26, 1957
Found on:Wednesday, January 30, 1957
Finders:
NameHometown
John A. SobotaSaint Paul
Prize:
Maximum Prize:$2500
Awarded Prize:$2500
Location:
General Location:Battle Creek Park
Exact Location:Near the county workhouse farm
Concealer:Above ground in a clump of roots
Clues
Published on Sunday, January 27, 1957
Hidden in Boreas' vast domain,
Lies his treasure chest,
There are trees nearby and if you're spry,
These clues will solve your quest.
Explanation:
"Trees" and "spry" were the key words pointing to a wooded area.
Our Thoughts:
We've moved from Boreas' rollicking realm to his vast domain. And not even because of rhyming.
 
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Published on Monday, January 28, 1957
We remind you hunters again this year,
From private property you must stay clear.
Don't dig up all the ground in sight.
There's another clue coming out tonight.
Explanation:
Merely pointed out that the treasure would not be found on private property.
Our Thoughts:
With all these early references to private property, we have to wonder if the official rules indicated that the treasure was hidden on public property as they do today.
 
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Published on Monday, January 28, 1957
You must see water to win the dough
It's probably frozen and covered with snow.
It takes hard work to find the loot,
So leave your house and join the pursuit.
Explanation:
The word "water" - indicating Battle Creek and two words in the last two lines, "work" and "house" identifying further the city property.
Our Thoughts:
A quick clue sleuth would have observed work and house appearing very close together to surmise workhouse for this clue.
 
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Published on Tuesday, January 29, 1957
There are roads around but not right there,
You'll have to walk to reach the lair.
Exercise is good for you,
With all that money in your view.
Explanation:
"Walk" indicated that no one would drive a car right up to the treasure trove.
Our Thoughts:
And exercise could have been a reference to the workers "exercising" their punishment on the farm.
 
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Published on Tuesday, January 29, 1957
A structure of metal, while out of view,
Lies to the north, and that's a clue.
It seems a crime to fade away,
But that is all you get today.
Explanation:
"Structure of metal" indicated the quonset-type metal storage structure near the treasure site.
Our Thoughts:
Crime could have also been a subtle workhouse reference.
 
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Published on Wednesday, January 30, 1957
If you really want to win the kitty,
Look on land owned by the city.
And if you want another clue,
There's a fence between the structure and you.
Explanation:
The word "kitty" has a double meaning indicating not only the prize itself, but in old English was slang for "jail". This clue mentioned the word "fence" for the first time, and to get into the city-owned workhouse farm property from the north, you must climb through a barb-wire fence.
 
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Published on Wednesday, January 30, 1957
If the water curves you're getting hot.
You could be standing at the spot.
Two dead trees should be in view.
We hope this is of help to you.
Explanation:
Indicated for the first time, with the use of the word "curves" that the water was either a creek or a river. The "two dead trees" is also important, the root of one holding the chest.
 
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Published on Thursday, January 31, 1957
There are birds around in the summertime
But food won't grow in this cold climate.
It's deserted now but soon will be
A place of great activity.
Explanation:
"Birds around in the summertime" - These would be the jail-birds doing the workhouse farming and producing "food" mentioned in line two. The scene becomes "a place of great activity" again in early summer.
Our Thoughts:
A great play on words to come up with jail birds working on the county farm.
 
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A cylindrical object colored tan,
Makes life convenient for urban man.
And from the fence above the chest,
It can be seen but not to the west.
Explanation:
Describes a city water tower visible from the treasure site.
 
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The closest road has no name,
But it's snow free just the same.
Two or three hundred yards away,
Is what you're looking for today.
Explanation:
Indicated a road on the north side of the site leading to the area, which "has no name". It also indicated that the treasure chest was located 200 or 300 yards from the road.
 
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Lexington and Bunker Hill
Were famous names and they are still.
Of curving water don't be wary,
Isn't this clue revolutionary?
Explanation:
Battle Creek itself - not the park - is pointed out in battles "Lexington and Bunker Hill".
 
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St. Paul, of course, is the city you seek,
The water referred to before is a creek.
Steep banks on either side arise.
Be careful climbing down to the prize.
Explanation:
"Creek" and "steep banks" referred to the fact that the treasure was near the creek and also pointed out that the finder would need to climb down to get the chest.
 
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Robin Hood once to a land gave fame,
And according to record this name was the same.
But 30 years later it's not that way.
Can you find this piece today?
Explanation:
Spoke of Robin Hood and the fame of "a land" - Sherwood Forest. "According to record, this name was the same." City land records indicate that the original platting of the workhouse farm property was in the name of "Sherwood" 30 years ago.
Our Thoughts:
Interesting, there's not an exact pinpointing clue like there is today.
 
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