1955 Pioneer Press Treasure Hunt

The treasure chest was magnetized and hidden under a green mailbox at the corner of Seventh and Robert. It was found by Mrs. Merrilla Paulson and her friend Mrs. Frances Rosner. Posing for a picture near the mailbox after the hunt was over were mailman John Schwietz and beat patrolman Dave Foley; they worked with and near the mailbox throughout the hunt and never had a clue (oops, bad pun). This hunt actually raised eyebrows on a federal level, since mailboxes are federal property and attaching something to the underside of one could be construed as tampering with the mail. Certainly something like this wouldn't be tolerated in modern times.

Hunt information
Dates:
First Clue:Saturday, January 29, 1955
Found on:Thursday, February 3, 1955
Finders:
NameHometown
Merrilla PaulsonSaint Paul
Frances RosnerSaint Paul
Prize:
Maximum Prize:$2000
Awarded Prize:$1500
Location:
General Location:Downtown Saint Paul
Exact Location:Underneath a mailbox at 7th and Robert Streets
Concealer:Magnetized under the mailbox
Clues
Published on Sunday, January 30, 1955
Welcome back to the treasure quest!
Ramsey County hides the chest.
Two thousand bucks is a lot to bank,
"Frosty Frolic" you should thank.
Explanation:
The word "bank" was the key word. It referred to the American National Bank on one of the four corners at Robert and Seventh.
Our Thoughts:
Risky. Very risky to make a reference to the location in the first clue. One could imagine that it wouldn't take long to check the public land in front of all the banks in the city. Kudos to the Press, because it worked.
 
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Published on Monday, January 31, 1955
The hunt is on, the chest is hid,
We know you hope to lift the lid.
The treasure chest is in St. Paul,
And for the present that is all.
Explanation:
The words "St. Paul" were intended to pull the hunt inside the city limits.
Our Thoughts:
One could also presumably take "lift the lid" to be a reference to the mailbox.
 
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Published on Monday, January 31, 1955
Safety first that has been our rule,
Ever since we went to school.
Don't risk your neck in dangerous pursuit;
Even a child could find this loot.
Explanation:
The word "rule" meant the Golden Rule, on the second of the four corners. The word "child" was for Rothchild's store on the third corner of the intersection where the treasure was hidden.
Our Thoughts:
They're still recycling lines for clues; not only lines, in fact, but entire clues. This one is actually Clue 3 of the 1954 Hunt.
 
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Published on Tuesday, February 1, 1955
Don't trespass on your neighbor's lawn,
It's not private property the treasure's on.
No body of water is in your view,
And that, my friends, is an important clue.
Explanation:
Was intended to keep everyone away from lakes and the river. "No body of water" were the tip-off words.
Our Thoughts:
Yup. More clue recycling. See 1955 clue 2.
 
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Published on Tuesday, February 1, 1955
In your view, towering high,
Six slender objects spike the sky;
A post's nearby and also a road,
Now you're near the treasure lode.
Explanation:
The phrase "six slender objects spike the sky" describes six flag poles that could be seen from the corner. "Post" was a hint about the mailbox where the chest was hidden.
Our Thoughts:
We're fans of British English, so in that context, "A post's nearby" makes sense for a mailbox. In United Statesian, however, post in grammar like this means post. As in something sunk into the ground to support something else. Nonetheless, a good clue.
 
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Published on Wednesday, February 2, 1955
A structure of red can be seen,
But more important is the color green;
Don't look here for another clue,
We've already been too good to you.
Explanation:
Mentioned the "red structure" which was the Ryan hotel, and "green" referred to the mailbox itself.
Our Thoughts:
Whew. It came close, but they didn't recycle the line from 1953's Seventh Clue.
 
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Published on Wednesday, February 2, 1955
The birds above don't sing of love,
But don't let this confuse you;
This seventh clue means more to you,
Than simply to amuse you.
Explanation:
"The birds above don't sing of love" - Those birds are sculptured ones on the top of the Golden Rule building. The second key word in that jingle was "seventh", which referred to the street.
Our Thoughts:
A clever use of the word seventh. It would be interesting to see if a clue like this would stimulate our modern-day over-noodling to see if seventh meant Seventh Street or if we'd employ Occam's Razor.
 
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Published on Thursday, February 3, 1955
If the vision you have is extra keen,
The top of a bridge can be seen;
Don't venture forth for a closer look,
For where you are is the treasure's nook.
Explanation:
Mentioned a bridge, and that was the Robert Street bridge.
Our Thoughts:
This is actually an interesting clue. In the context of the time, before Seventh Street was rerouted onto Eighth (and for a short time Ninth) Street, and Seventh Street between Jackson and Minnesota Streets became Seventh Place, Seventh Street was 4 blocks away from the Robert Street Bridge. The arches of this bridge are probably six or seven blocks away. A nice reference, particularly since it mentions only the top of the bridge, since the rest of the bridge isn't really visible from the intersection.
 
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Published on Thursday, February 3, 1955
About this time you need this aid,
So look for a place where you can trade.
It's not far from the treasure site.
Explanation:
Spoke of "a place you can trade" and that meant The Emporium. The word "emporium" in the dictionary is defined as a place where one may trade.
Our Thoughts:
Um, where's the fourth line to this clue. We looked behind the curtain and couldn't find it.
 
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Published on Friday, February 4, 1955
Read these words to find the spot,
Each letter might mean an awful lot:
Robert Q. and the Cavaliers,
Came to town and brought forth cheers.
Can you solve this clue tonight?
Explanation:
Had two key words. "Robert" was the actual street name and "letter" was one more attempt to bring the mailbox into the picture.
Our Thoughts:
We think we found the missing line from clue 9. Too bad it's in the wrong spot to make rhyming sense.
 
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Stones are near the treasure site,
Cemented together to hold them tight;
A sign appears when you arrive,
With figures on it that total five.
Explanation:
The sign with "figures on it that total five" is the Hwy. 212 junction sign with the figures adding up to five.
Our Thoughts:
Don't go looking for the Highway 212 sign nowadays. In the 50's it ran through to Stillwater via what is now Minnesota Highway 5. Back in the 80's it got shortened and now ends in Eden Prairie. We want to know what the stones were though. Cobblestones perhaps?
 
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Regular visits are made to the spot,
To help someone improve his lot;
A palace was built not far away,
To serve the needs of another day.
Explanation:
The phrase "regular visits" was intended to suggest the mailman who visited the mailbox and "palace" was a reference to the old name of the Rothchild building.
Our Thoughts:
This clue would have better served the hunt had it been placed a few clues earlier.
 
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And here it is the final clue,
Telling you what exactly to do;
Go up Seventh in the heart of the loop,
Stop at Robert, then give a whoop.
The chest, you'll find, can easily be seen,
If you look below a structure of green,
Hanging there but not kinetic,
Held by things which are MAGNETIC;
We've had much fun, we must confess,
Good hunting from the Dispatch-Pioneer Press.
Explanation:
It is a dead giveaway. There you have the magnetized box clinging to the green mailbox at the bank corner of Seventh and Robert.
Our Thoughts:
The best giveaway to date.
 
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