1956 Pioneer Press Treasure Hunt

The treasure chest was found in a hollow log in Como Park after just eight clues by Harold Mantoen, Miss Lee Kosek, and Dale Ulmer. Harold was a strapping 26-year-old railroad machinist at the time, Miss Kosek was his 29-year-old girlfriend, and Dale his 7-year-old nephew whom he promised to take treasure hunting. What a guy—popular with the older women and the favorite uncle.

Hunt information
Dates:
First Clue:Saturday, January 28, 1956
Found on:Thursday, February 2, 1956
Finders:
NameHometown
Harold MantoenSaint Paul
Leonora KosekSaint Paul
Dale UlmerSaint Paul
Prize:
Maximum Prize:$2500
Awarded Prize:$2500
Location:
General Location:Como Park
Exact Location:Near the Old Stone Fireplace
Concealer:Inside a Hollow Log
Clues
Published on Sunday, January 29, 1956
Today begins the annual hunt,
Another wonderful Carnival stunt.
So go abroad and find the bounty,
We always hide it in Ramsey County.
Explanation:
"Ramsey County" were the only meaningful words.
 
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Published on Monday, January 30, 1956
The button you buy means more than pleasure;
It can add more dough to Boreas' treasure.
St. Paul is the boundary of your quest
If you would find the treasure chest.
Explanation:
The word button referred to the polar bear on the carnival button and the bears at Como Zoo. The second clue also confined the search to St. Paul.
 
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Published on Monday, January 30, 1956
The treasure's nook, well hid from view,
On public property waits for you.
Our safety rule must be repeated:
No danger's involved where it's secreted.
Explanation:
"Nook" meant the treasure was hidden in a recess and "On public property." The word "secreted" emphasized how well it was hidden from view.
Our Thoughts:
Secreted? Where exactly has it secreted and what specifically has it secreted?
 
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Published on Tuesday, January 31, 1956
A body of water lies in the distance,
Out of sight but still of assistance.
Unless a thaw should cause a trickle,
Seeing water's not worth a plugged nickel.
Explanation:
"A body of water lies in the distance" meant Lake Como, and "plugged nickel" referred to the plugged log.
Our Thoughts:
Plugged we get. Nickel, not so much.
 
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Published on Tuesday, January 31, 1956
We hope we are fair in the way we play;
We try to hint without giving away.
But if more help is what you need,
Wheels and boxes we will concede.
Explanation:
The words "fair" and "way" together meant the fairways at Como Golf Course. "Wheels and boxes" pointed to the Northern Pacific railway yards.
Our Thoughts:
You always have to love a word play clue. And this one is a two-fer.
 
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Published on Wednesday, February 1, 1956
A dirty finger points to the sky;
It's not on the spot, but stands nearby.
And if your eyes are really keen,
A second look will show you green.
Explanation:
A "dirty finger" was the smokestack at St. Paul workhouse and "a second look will show you green" indicated the cupola atop the workhouse.
Our Thoughts:
A cool landmarking clue.
 
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Published on Wednesday, February 1, 1956
Near the spot, fifty yards or so,
Runs a road covered with snow.
Trees surround the treasure's site;
This should make you work all night.
Explanation:
The "road covered with snow" was an old railroad bed, and the "work" once again referred to the workhouse.
Our Thoughts:
The "road" specifically was the old Como-Harriet Streetcar line whose right-of-way ran very near the treasure site.
 
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Published on Thursday, February 2, 1956
Bugs at times crawl near the spot;
Generally pests, they now mean a lot.
A woodsman skilled in nature lore
Would be a help and not a bore.
Explanation:
"Bugs at times crawl near the spot" meant box elder bugs. A box elder bush was near the treasure site. And "bore" again referred to the hollow log.
Our Thoughts:
Combine this with "Wheels and boxes" from above and you've got an awesome box elder reference. Without them, the bugs could really be anything.
 
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The water referred to in number four clue
Is a famous name that means much to you.
In order to get a bit more specific,
The water's a lake and not the Pacific.
Explanation:
The "water" and the "famous name" both meant Como.
Our Thoughts:
This is the only example of a clue we can find that references another clue in the same hunt.
 
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A structure of red is not too far,
About ninety degrees from the Polar Star.
Get out your compass, we suggest,
It will help you find the treasure chest.
Explanation:
"The structure of red" 90 degrees "from the polar star" meant the workhouse was east of the treasure site.
Our Thoughts:
But 90 degrees could also mean west, couldn't it?
 
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Stones are near the treasure site,
Cemented together to hold them tight.
This time of year you'd stay away,
But that's not true on a summer's day.
Explanation:
"Stones" referred to an old stone fireplace near the treasure site.
Our Thoughts:
We like the stone fireplace reference due to its proximity to the treasure. But wouldn't you think that "this time of year" you'd want to be closer to a fire place than on a summer's day?
 
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Two names could mean an awful lot,
In helping you to find the spot.
One is Dutch, you will agree,
Part of the other is on T.V.
Explanation:
"Two names" referred to Van Slyke ("one is Dutch") and Beulah Lane. "Part of the other is on T.V." referred to a television show titled Beulah
Our Thoughts:
Interestingly enough, a lot of people nowadays call the fireplace a "Dutch Oven".
 
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A crossing was built not far away
To serve the needs of another day.
Near the place there is a knoll,
Nearer still there is a hole.
Explanation:
The "crossing" was an old street car crossing "to serve the needs of another day". The "knoll" painted a small hill west of the workhouse and "hole" pinpointed a low area at the base of the knoll as well as hinting at the hole in the long.
Our Thoughts:
Nice. Several landmarks to zero in on the treasure site near the end of the hunt.
 
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From an acorn this once grew,
And it means a lot to you.
Now dead and lying there dismembered,
To someone it will be long remembered.
Explanation:
"From an acorn this once grew" meant of course, the oak stump in which the treasure chest was secreted.
Our Thoughts:
There's that word secreted again. What exactly secreted the treasure here?
 
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The trunk of a dead tree helps mark the spot,
But the log lying near is really hot.
Look for a plug which pulls away;
This can be your lucky day.
Explanation:
"The trunk of a dead tree" referred to a tree which had fallen near the log containing the chest. The "plug which pulls away" meant the end of the log which covered the chest.
Our Thoughts:
A pin-pointer clue.
 
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